Keep Your Goal Before Your Eyes

Imagine your ideal life—how would it be different than what your life is like today?  Spend a few quiet minutes thinking on this, and you’ll find the key areas where you’re ready to set a goal.  Make your goal bigger that what you think you can do, in order to stretch you and challenge you.  This exercise can be inspiring, motivating, and exciting, but soon comes the hard part of getting it done!

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Can You Keep Going?

You can achieve the big goals that are currently out of reach, and the path there is simpler and more straightforward that you think.  But one thing is required:  consistent right action.  Take a physical example:  losing weight.  In order to drop that ten pounds, all you have to do is lose half a pound a day for twenty days.  How?  Increase your energy output and reduce your calorie intake—it really is as simple as that.  But, here’s the hard part—on day three, when you’re hungry and your body is sore, will you continue with the consistent right action of eating healthy and exercise, or will you take a break and let your goals fade into memory?

The Slight Edge Principle

Setting goals is important.  But alone, the activity of setting a goal may not bring you what you want.  Once you set a goal, you must commit to it, and keep the goal in front of your eyes.  Like many principles of success, this important step is easy to do.  But easy to do is also easy not to do, and oftentimes we skip this important step, to our own peril.

How to Keep the Goal in Mind

What does it mean to keep a goal before your eyes?  Well, first it means that your goal must be written down.  Have a number and a date (for example, run a mile in seven minutes by December 15, 2013) so you have a clear idea where you are going.  Next, find a way to bring your goal to the front of your mind every day.  Some helpful ideas here include writing your goal and taping it to you bathroom mirror.  Some people ask others to help keep them on track towards their goals by checking in with them every few days, or even pursuing a similar goal at the same time.  One idea that I found strange at first was to actually speak your goals out loud every day.  What at first felt very silly became a valuable tool in training my mind to see and take action toward my goals every day.  Whatever method you want to use, the main key is to keep your mind on your goal.

Your Mind Working for You

Your mind is an amazing thing, and if you take the time to focus it on your goals, you will be astounded how it starts seeing opportunities around you every day.  Stay committed, stay steady, and start down the path toward living the thriving life that’s waiting for you!

No Breaks!

One of the most important aspects of any successful training regimen (or perhaps any pursuit in life) is consistency. Today, we’ll discuss the importance of sticking with your workouts and never letting too much time pass between training sessions.

Here Comes an Excuse

As you may have read in previous posts, I had the joy of traveling to Indiahoma, Oklahoma last week to share the gospel of Jesus Christ with the children, youth, and adults in the community. We had an awesome time (more to come on that soon) and forged many wonderful relationships. However, there was one thing we didn’t do while there—workouts!

While I was able to stay pretty active moving rubble from a burned-down building, swimming at the lake, and even a bit of free climbing, I didn’t lift any heavy weights. And, though I intended to go on a few runs and do some bodyweight exercises, I never managed to make it happen.

The Price That Must Be Paid

Consequently, I was in for a rough day back to the gym today. My last full workout was 6 days ago, and that’s much too long to go between workouts. My metcon of heavy squats, dips, dumbbell jerks and pull-ups started off well, but I ran out of steam about 3 minutes in and my whole body began to feel like Jello.

I’m afraid that there’s no good way to get around the rough spot that I found myself in today, should you skip too many workouts. The only way to get past it is to go right through. So, that’s exactly what I did, pushing my Jello-feeling body through the next 15 minutes of punishment. By the end, I was totally wiped, and struggled to catch my breath for about five minutes.

The Reward on the Other Side

However, once I did catch my breath, I began feeling much better, even better that I had felt all day. I spent the next 10-15 minutes stretching my hips and calves, which had grown rather tight and immobile in the two 10-hour bus rides that we’d taken last week. All in all, I felt great by the end, but there were some rough moments in there for sure.

Learn from Mistakes

As you can probably tell, I’ve been through this a time or two in the past, and have learned to avoid this situation as much as possible. Since I powered through today, I’ll likely be back in a good groove tomorrow or the next day. Getting back in a good rhythm requires paying a high price, though, as I experienced today, so I’ll be working to avoid another slip in the future.

Be Good to Your Body

One or two days of resting and stretching can be a great way to rejuvenate your body and recover from a tough workout. But three days can be dangerous and four days is trouble. If you make my mistake and wait six days between, you’re in for a rough day back, so don’t let it happen to you! Make workouts your habit four to five days a week, and even if it’s just a few rounds of sprints and push-ups, your body will thank you for avoiding the punishment of a “first day back!”